Reduce Your Inflammation with This Popular Supplement

Probiotics are a key component for better gut health, a stronger immune system, and much more. In this post, we discuss the role of probiotics in reducing inflammation.

If you need help healing your gut, click here

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Reduce Your Inflammation with This Popular Supplement

Probiotics are a key component for better gut health, a stronger immune system, and much more. Probiotics not only improve the balance of your gut microbiota in favor of the healthy bacteria, but are also helpful in either preventing or improving the outcomes of a number of health conditions, such as obesity, insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, mental health issues, and neurological disorders.

Some beneficial effects of probiotics include modulation of intestinal microbiota, strengthening of the epithelial barrier, and immunomodulation.

A recent systematic review with meta-analysis evaluated the role of probiotics for reducing inflammation. This type of study is a very reliable source since it is a compilation of numerous individual clinical trials. The study consisted of 20 clinical trials that looked at the effect of probiotics on reducing CRP.

Serum C-reactive protein (CRP) is a marker of systemic inflammation, and is elevated in the presence of chronic conditions.

The systematic review confirmed that probiotics significantly reduce inflammation, specifically CRP (C-reactive protein).

It wasn’t just one type of probiotic either. Many different strains of probiotics were used in the different trials. Therefore, we can conclude that probiotics as a class are effective for reducing inflammation.

How can probiotics reduce inflammation?

Several mechanisms have been suggested concerning the impact of probiotics on inflammation and inflammatory factors.

  1. Probiotics can prevent or repair ‘leaky’ epithelial barriers and indirectly affect the inflammatory response.
  2. Probiotics increase production of short-chain fatty acids (SCFA), such as butyrate, which has an anti-inflammatory function.
  3. Probiotics enhance synthesis of antimicrobial peptides that influence inflammation resolution pathways in the mucosa.
  4. The anti-inflammatory properties of some strains of probiotics are thought to act by reducing mucosal inflammation via modulation of cytokine levels.
  5. The decreased inflammation and oxidative stress due to probiotics might be due to their effects on increasing glutathione (GSH) levels.
  6. The gut is a main source of inflammation. Probiotics have demonstrated they can help heal the gut, and therefore drive down inflammation.
  7. Your immune system is a major contributor to inflammation. The majority of your immune cells reside in your intestine where the probiotics work. Probiotics have immune modulating properties.
  8. Probiotics may also help reduce unhealthy bacteria and fungus in the gut. Through this process, inflammation will be reduced.

What does this information mean?

If you’re not feeling well, start by healing your gut. There are many components involved in healing your gut, but taking a high quality probiotic along with an anti-inflammatory diet is a great place to start.

To learn more about probiotics and inflammation, watch our video here.


If you need help healing your gut, click here

What do you think? I would like to hear your thoughts or experience with this.

Dr. Ruscio is your leading functional and integrative doctor specializing in gut related disorders such as SIBO, leaky gut, Celiac, IBS and in thyroid disorders such as hypothyroid and hyperthyroid. For more information on how to become a patient, please contact our office. Serving the San Francisco bay area and distance patients via phone and Skype.

Discussion

I care about answering your questions and sharing my knowledge with you. Leave a comment or connect with me on social media asking any health question you may have and I just might incorporate it into our next listener questions podcast episode just for you!

30 thoughts on “Reduce Your Inflammation with This Popular Supplement

  1. Hi Dr. Ruscio, I’m a Family Practice Doc and am starting to dip my toes into functional medicine. I serve a relatively poor population so I identify with your approach of care that is both efficient and effective.

    What kind of biomarkers do you think are most effective for measuring the response to probiotics? From this research it looks like CRP may be helpful (though it would be nice to see research regarding CRP’s correlation with clinical conditions such as SIBO). But is there anything else?

    1. Hi Andrew,
      Great question. Probiotics can helps so many markers (SIBO, CRP, FBG, insulin, cholesterol, HDL…) and symptoms (IBS, depression…) that in my opinion its not practical to track via biomarkers. I would look to their symptomatic improvement as the main gauge. Especially because its likely you may see biomarker improvement be confounded if you are also making diet and lifestyle changes.
      Hope this helps!

  2. Thank you for your interesting posts. When I see your emails in my inbox I know there will be something of value to read. I appreciate that you make us aware of current research about the gut.

  3. Hi Dr. Ruscio, I’m a Family Practice Doc and am starting to dip my toes into functional medicine. I serve a relatively poor population so I identify with your approach of care that is both efficient and effective.

    What kind of biomarkers do you think are most effective for measuring the response to probiotics? From this research it looks like CRP may be helpful (though it would be nice to see research regarding CRP’s correlation with clinical conditions such as SIBO). But is there anything else?

    1. Hi Andrew,
      Great question. Probiotics can helps so many markers (SIBO, CRP, FBG, insulin, cholesterol, HDL…) and symptoms (IBS, depression…) that in my opinion its not practical to track via biomarkers. I would look to their symptomatic improvement as the main gauge. Especially because its likely you may see biomarker improvement be confounded if you are also making diet and lifestyle changes.
      Hope this helps!

  4. Thank you for your interesting posts. When I see your emails in my inbox I know there will be something of value to read. I appreciate that you make us aware of current research about the gut.

    1. Hi Ondina,
      See our clinic store for some options. Also, you might be someone who does not do well with probiotics. Some people don’t do well on any, and thats OK 🙂

  5. Dr Ruscio,

    Do you have patients with not only SIBO but candida albicans, motility problems and parasites as well? In your opinion which should be addressed first, second?

    Warm Regards

    Kelly

    1. Hi Kelly,
      Yes. Many herbal treatments address SIBO, candida and parasites all at once. Address these will also help motility but formal motility treatments are usually started after antimicrobial treatment.

  6. Dr Ruscio,

    Do you have patients with not only SIBO but candida albicans, motility problems and parasites as well? In your opinion which should be addressed first, second?

    Warm Regards

    Kelly

    1. Hi Kelly,
      Yes. Many herbal treatments address SIBO, candida and parasites all at once. Address these will also help motility but formal motility treatments are usually started after antimicrobial treatment.

  7. Dr. Ruscio,

    I was tested for SIBO a few months ago and had high hydrogen levels (peak H2 Production 71ppm) even though I have IBS-C. Beginning in January I started a 5 week course of herbal treatment (Allicin, Oregano oil caps, Neep Plus, Berberine) and stuck to a strict low-FODMAP diet, no carbs, now in etc. and within one week I felt fantastic! After the treatment ended I thought I was cured. I took a follow up breath test and my numbers were all zero. I was starting to slow down and feel sluggish again and having small bouts of gut distress. My doctor suggested I may have hydrogen sulfide SIBO so we started another round of herbal protocol. This time around I am not following a strict low FODMAP diet, have had 1-2 glasses of wine/week, and I feel awful. Could it be I am now feeding the SIBO and it is fighting me? Should I stick to the low-FODMAP diet, gluten free, wine free etc? I am frustrated that I felt so amazing for 5 weeks and now I feel horrible. I have been on a low FODMAP, gluten free diet since last April and I am losing my patience. Please advise. Thank you. Andrea

  8. Dr. Ruscio,

    I was tested for SIBO a few months ago and had high hydrogen levels (peak H2 Production 71ppm) even though I have IBS-C. Beginning in January I started a 5 week course of herbal treatment (Allicin, Oregano oil caps, Neep Plus, Berberine) and stuck to a strict low-FODMAP diet, no carbs, now in etc. and within one week I felt fantastic! After the treatment ended I thought I was cured. I took a follow up breath test and my numbers were all zero. I was starting to slow down and feel sluggish again and having small bouts of gut distress. My doctor suggested I may have hydrogen sulfide SIBO so we started another round of herbal protocol. This time around I am not following a strict low FODMAP diet, have had 1-2 glasses of wine/week, and I feel awful. Could it be I am now feeding the SIBO and it is fighting me? Should I stick to the low-FODMAP diet, gluten free, wine free etc? I am frustrated that I felt so amazing for 5 weeks and now I feel horrible. I have been on a low FODMAP, gluten free diet since last April and I am losing my patience. Please advise. Thank you. Andrea

  9. Hi I’ve been diagnosed with Sibo via a 3hr lactulose test. Home kit. I’m trying to find someone to help me in the UK. Do you know of any Functional practitioner who is experienced in Sibo issues in the UK? Thankyou

  10. Hi I’ve been diagnosed with Sibo via a 3hr lactulose test. Home kit. I’m trying to find someone to help me in the UK. Do you know of any Functional practitioner who is experienced in Sibo issues in the UK? Thankyou

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