Can Food Allergy Testing Help Hashimoto’s Hypothyroid?

Can food allergy testing help Hashimoto’s hypothyroid? The answer is no. However, you can take steps to improve your digestive health and thus improve your thyroid. Let’s discuss a recent study which found you don’t need to perform food allergy testing if you have Hashimoto’s hypothyroid. We will also discuss steps you can take to heal your thyroid through the gut-thyroid connection.


Dr. Michael Ruscio, DC: Hey, everyone. This is Dr. Ruscio. Let’s talk about food allergy testing, and if food allergy testing can help those with Hashimoto’s, with thyroid autoimmunity. And I’d like to thank Dr. Nick Hedberg for making me aware of this study. I’ll put the abstract of this study up here on the screen. This study was entitled Evaluation of Correlations Between Food-Specific Antibodies and Clinical Aspects of Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis.

[Continue reading below]

Dr. R’s Fast Facts Summary

Does food allergy testing help to improve thyroid autoimmunity?

Study: Evaluation of Correlations Between Food-Specific Antibodies and Clinical Aspects of Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis.

  • According to this study, “there is no evidence that increased food-specific IgG antibodies are associated with clinical aspects of Hashimoto’s thyroiditis (HT).”
  • However, it is important to note that improving diet (paleo-like diet) can improve thyroid autoimmunity as we previously discussed here.
    • You don’t need allergy testing in order to try a Paleo or Paleo AI diet
    • A low FODMAP Diet may also improve thyroid autoimmunity especially if you have carbohydrate malabsorption issues

Healing your gut

  • There is a high association to thyroid autoimmunity to:
    • Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth (SIBO)
    • H. pylori
  • The gut has an enormous impact on your immune system and your small intestine – where the largest density of immune cells reside.
    • Does healing your gut guarantee improvement for thyroid autoimmunity? Not entirely, but healing the gut should be your baseline for treatment. Start from a healthy gut and go from there.
  • What can you do?
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Food Allergy Testing and Thyroid Autoimmunity

So, the question here really is, is if you have thyroid autoimmunity, which is the most common cause of hypothyroidism, might you have higher levels of food allergies, and could a food allergy test tell you those food allergies, and then could avoiding those foods help reduce your thyroid autoimmunity, and thus help with the function of your thyroid and hopefully, your symptoms? According to this study, no. And let me quote a few pieces from the study.

AdobeStock204182964WEBThere was no significant correlation between any of the 12 increased food-specific antibodies, including gluten, and clinically important phenotypes such as thyroid hormone levels or thyroid antibody levels or symptoms. So essentially, what they found, to state that more clearly, is that there was an equal elevation in healthy controls as there was in those with thyroid autoimmunity. So, those with Hashimoto’s had some elevations of certain food allergens, and healthy controls had certain elevations of food allergens.

And here’s how the allergens skewed, in terms of most common allergen, all the way down through the least common allergen. Milk was the most. Milk and eggs, followed then by grains, followed then by nuts, followed then by legumes, followed then by fruits, or fruits and vegetables, and then finally, by fish, then seafood, then meat, and then coffee and tea. So, what we see here, milk, eggs, grains, nuts, and legumes were the most common food allergens detected. But there was no difference, meaning there were not any more food allergies detected in those with thyroid autoimmunity.

“So, one could go on a Paleo-like diet, and depending on the version of Paleo Diet that you do, you would be cutting out milk, maybe eggs, definitely grains, and legumes, and potentially nuts…”tweet e1540485375388

Now, what’s funny about this, and what you may have heard me say previously is, that I don’t use food allergy testing because we’ve figured out, meaning the scientific and dietary community at large has figured out, what the most common food allergens are. And these are depicted in one of a handful of readily available diets, one of which is a Paleo Diet. So, one could go on a Paleo-like diet, and depending on the version of Paleo Diet that you do, you would be cutting out milk, maybe eggs, definitely grains, and legumes, and potentially nuts, depending on if you do kind of your regular Paleo or the more strict, more avoidant version of the Paleo Diet known as the Autoimmune (or AI) Paleo Diet.

And both of these are fairly easy to obtain a food list for on the Internet, or in my book. It’s not like … If you’re not familiar with these things, they’re not hard to find and figure out what to eat and what not to eat. Now, here’s something that I think is important.  We have evidence showing that essentially, a Paleo-like diet was used in one clinical trial, and did show the ability to lead to a 40 to 44% reduction in thyroid peroxidase and thyroglobulin antibodies. So, we do have documentation that avoiding foods that are commonly known to be problematic can improve thyroid autoimmunity.

But, you don’t need to do an expensive blood test to document a food allergy to justify avoidance of the food. By the time you went to the doctor’s office or the lab, drew the blood, waited for the results to come back, and then started your diet, you could already be three weeks into a trial on a Paleo-like diet, and ostensibly, feeling better.

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So, skip the testing. Go right to an elimination diet to see if you feel better avoiding some of these foods.

30265836Now, it’s also important to mention that in this same study that I mentioned a moment ago that showed the 40 to 44% reduction in thyroid antibodies on a Paleo-like diet, there was also a suggestion that these patients may have suffered from a degree of carbohydrate malabsorption. And now, what does that mean? It means you don’t absorb carbohydrates well, just as the label implies. So, this opens the door to the possibility that these Hashimoto’s patients may also do well on a lower FODMAP diet, which reduces foods that feed bacteria.

And there is a fairly impressive initial body of data, preliminary data, showing a correlation between small intestinal bacterial overgrowth and thyroid autoimmunity. Also, one study showing a correlation between H. pylori and thyroid autoimmunity. But I think there’s more impressive data looking at the association and documenting the association between small intestinal bacterial overgrowth, SIBO, which will make you sensitive to FODMAPs, and thyroid autoimmunity.

Healing your gut

So, if all that seems like a lot, what do you do? It’s actually not that complicated. What you want to do is heal your gut. Because if you can heal your gut and improve the health of your gut, then you can arguably, improve the health of your thyroid. Is it a guarantee? No. But we know that the gut is very impactful on your immune system because you do harbor the largest density of immune cells in your entire body in the small intestine. So, if you can fix your gut, as this one study has shown with the utilization of a Paleo-like diet, you may see a 40 to 44% reduction in thyroid antibodies.

fodmap foodNow, to build on that, perhaps if you go low FODMAP, that can help you even more. And perhaps if you treated H. pylori or SIBO, or just went through an antimicrobial protocol to help clean out any excess or imbalanced bacteria, you may improve further yet, still. And certainly, that’s something I see in the clinic somewhat frequently. I’ve seen that enough now, I’ve seen enough patients who, after improving the health of their gut and treating some type of dysbiosis, or bacterial overgrowth, some patients, and we’ve even documented some of this on a clinical newsletter, have been able to reduce the dose of their thyroid medication, but feel better at the same time.

So, a lot here, I’m giving to you, kind of in rapid fire. But it all comes down to this – the bottom line in optimizing your thyroid health is improving the health of your gut. And the book that I’ve written, Healthy Gut, Healthy You is the most comprehensive roadmap I could offer you in improving your gut health, and it tends to improve your thyroid health. So, remember that if you’re confronted with a decision to perform a food allergy test, I would save that money and just go right into a dietary trial, again, my book will help you with knowing how to perform these dietary trials. And that could again, keep money in your pocket and get you to the end result more quickly. So, yes, there is an association between gut health and the thyroid. But no, you don’t need to spend money on expensive food allergy testing to obtain the benefits of the diet-gut-thyroid connection. This is Dr. Ruscio and hopefully, this information helps you get healthy and get back to your life. Thanks.

What do you think? I would like to hear your thoughts or experience with this.

Dr. Ruscio is your leading functional and integrative doctor specializing in gut related disorders such as SIBO, leaky gut, Celiac, IBS and in thyroid disorders such as hypothyroid and hyperthyroid. For more information on how to become a patient, please contact our office. Serving the San Francisco bay area and distance patients via phone and Skype.

Discussion

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10 thoughts on “Can Food Allergy Testing Help Hashimoto’s Hypothyroid?

  1. Is there a recipe book you would recommend along these lines? Also, what do you think about lowering lectin foods to combat inflammation? I was diagnosed 20+ years ago with low stomach acid using the Heidelberg test. Since then I have had bouts of parasite issues including hookworm, H pylori, SIBO, gut dysbiosis, adrenal fatigue, mitochondrial dysfunction, Hashimoto’s, etc. I have been doing Dr Gundry’s lectin free diet for a couple years and had a great deal of relief until I added in some resistant starches earlier this year. I already feels so limited as I also do loW FODMAP. What you’re saying makes a lot of sense to at least try it for a few weeks. Thanks!

    1. Hi Cindy,

      A lot of people like The Essential AIP Cookbook by Louise Hendon, but if you type AIP in google or amazon, you’ll find a ton of great resources.

      Dr R actually did a podcast with Dr Gundry a little while ago that you may find helpful: https://drruscio.com/low-lectin-diet-evolution-gluten-free-diet-dr-steven-gundry/

      You may also want to think about getting talking to your doctor about testing for APCA if you’ve taken steps to increase stomach acid production without much luck.

      Hope this helps!

  2. Been on SIBO low fod/SCD diet 6 months, Went downhill, so after 2 months I went to a nutritionist & took a Mediator Release Test & eliminated the foods I was reacting to & continued with the SIBO diet. Helped for a few weeks. Then I did 2 months of antimicrobials to treat my SIBO, & when that was finished I retested for SIBO. (haven’t gotten results back, but still have symptoms) During all this time, my thyroid antibodies remain around 800, and my TSH fluctuates between 10 – 20, with Free T3 & T4 on the high end of the normal range. Increasing Synthroid dosage causes reactions that are extremely uncomfortable, so I take it crushed & sublingually, per endocrinologist instructions. (I tried all the natural thyroid pills over the last 1 1/2 years & had same results.) My diet is so restricted now that I feel weak & shaky much of the time, my stomach is nauseous, bloated & gurgling almost constantly, and I have periods of feeling sped up, palpitations, flushing & then chills & stuffed nose after eating. This happens any time I try to reintroduce a food, and often with the foods I’m supposed to be able to tolerate. I tried the recommended supplements to support my adrenal function, and that made all the symptoms so much worse I could hardly stand it, so I stopped them after a few days. I recently began supplement powder to help rebuild gut lining & liquid vitamin/mineral supplement that’s supposed to be absorbed better, from nutritionist’s recommendations. I wondered about histamine intolerance, but if I eliminate meat, all I will have left to eat is lettuce & a few green beans. The improvements I’ve noticed since starting your protocol are that I no longer need a PPI because I don’t get much heartburn anymore. And I can sleep 3-4 hours without waking up every hour. But I’m not sure what to do about the diet part, as I seem to feel sick with all the restrictions and feel sicker when I try to add foods. Any suggestions?

  3. I have Hashimotos disease but lately have seen an increase in too and muscle soreness. I am gluten and dairy free. What should I do.Do you have any suggestions?

  4. Is there a recipe book you would recommend along these lines? Also, what do you think about lowering lectin foods to combat inflammation? I was diagnosed 20+ years ago with low stomach acid using the Heidelberg test. Since then I have had bouts of parasite issues including hookworm, H pylori, SIBO, gut dysbiosis, adrenal fatigue, mitochondrial dysfunction, Hashimoto’s, etc. I have been doing Dr Gundry’s lectin free diet for a couple years and had a great deal of relief until I added in some resistant starches earlier this year. I already feels so limited as I also do loW FODMAP. What you’re saying makes a lot of sense to at least try it for a few weeks. Thanks!

    1. Hi Cindy,

      A lot of people like The Essential AIP Cookbook by Louise Hendon, but if you type AIP in google or amazon, you’ll find a ton of great resources.

      Dr R actually did a podcast with Dr Gundry a little while ago that you may find helpful: https://drruscio.com/low-lectin-diet-evolution-gluten-free-diet-dr-steven-gundry/

      You may also want to think about getting talking to your doctor about testing for APCA if you’ve taken steps to increase stomach acid production without much luck.

      Hope this helps!

  5. Been on SIBO low fod/SCD diet 6 months, Went downhill, so after 2 months I went to a nutritionist & took a Mediator Release Test & eliminated the foods I was reacting to & continued with the SIBO diet. Helped for a few weeks. Then I did 2 months of antimicrobials to treat my SIBO, & when that was finished I retested for SIBO. (haven’t gotten results back, but still have symptoms) During all this time, my thyroid antibodies remain around 800, and my TSH fluctuates between 10 – 20, with Free T3 & T4 on the high end of the normal range. Increasing Synthroid dosage causes reactions that are extremely uncomfortable, so I take it crushed & sublingually, per endocrinologist instructions. (I tried all the natural thyroid pills over the last 1 1/2 years & had same results.) My diet is so restricted now that I feel weak & shaky much of the time, my stomach is nauseous, bloated & gurgling almost constantly, and I have periods of feeling sped up, palpitations, flushing & then chills & stuffed nose after eating. This happens any time I try to reintroduce a food, and often with the foods I’m supposed to be able to tolerate. I tried the recommended supplements to support my adrenal function, and that made all the symptoms so much worse I could hardly stand it, so I stopped them after a few days. I recently began supplement powder to help rebuild gut lining & liquid vitamin/mineral supplement that’s supposed to be absorbed better, from nutritionist’s recommendations. I wondered about histamine intolerance, but if I eliminate meat, all I will have left to eat is lettuce & a few green beans. The improvements I’ve noticed since starting your protocol are that I no longer need a PPI because I don’t get much heartburn anymore. And I can sleep 3-4 hours without waking up every hour. But I’m not sure what to do about the diet part, as I seem to feel sick with all the restrictions and feel sicker when I try to add foods. Any suggestions?

  6. I have Hashimotos disease but lately have seen an increase in too and muscle soreness. I am gluten and dairy free. What should I do.Do you have any suggestions?

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