Gut Infection Linked to Hypothyroid

In this video, we discuss how the treatment of a gut infection can help with hypothyroidism and thyroid autoimmunity. The most common cause of hypothyroid is thyroid autoimmunity, known as Hashimoto’s. Given the strong connection between your gut and your immune system, treating an underlying gut infection may offer improvement with your autoimmune condition.

If you need help with your thyroid or gut health, click here

Gut Infection Linked to Hypothyroid

Dr. Michael Ruscio: Hi, this is Dr. Ruscio and let’s discuss how the treatment of a gut infection can actually help with hypothyroidism and with thyroid autoimmunity.

Some of the context here, the most common cause of hypothyroidism is autoimmunity. And autoimmunity is a process in which your immune system attacks your thyroid gland and causes damage to the gland. And that causes subsequent hypothyroidism.

Now, there’s also a very well-understood connection between your gut and your immune system. Many of the patients that I work with, for example, come to see me because they have an autoimmune condition, and they want to check to see if there is any underlying problem in the gut that may be contributing to that.

So this is something that clinically, we certainly see quite a bit of observation that by improving one’s gut health, they can improve an autoimmune condition. However, this is an area where the clinical science is a little bit sparse. And for people that are very skeptical, doctors, or patients that are skeptical, having the published science can be really helpful. This is where this recent publication was or is helpful.

A patient who is 49 years of age, who had a blastocystis hominis infection was treated with an antibiotic for that infection. This patient experienced an improvement in her thyroid hormone levels and also experienced a decline in their thyroid antibody levels that lasted well over a year.

So this is one person. So we can’t infer too much from one person. But it certainly supports what many clinicians that work with the gut have seen for years and years and years now, which is that by fixing problems in the gut, we can have a positive impact on the immune system.

Now, I should also mention that there was another Italian study published showing that treating [H. Pylori], a bacterial infection in the gut, can also improve thyroid autoimmunity. And this was in a group of ten patients.

Certainly, with every day, I think we’re seeing the published medical literature catch up to what clinicians are noticing, which is by improving gut health—one way of doing that is by clearing infections—we can have a positive impact on autoimmunity.

Now, the organism that was treated, again in the first study that I mentioned, was blastocystis hominis, which is also interesting and noteworthy because this organism—it’s actually a protozoa—isn’t really classified as being bad for you or as being good for you. It’s kind of in this gray area. And usually what helps us determine if treatment of this blastocystis hominis, which is a protozoa, is warranted is the health of the patient.

If you find this in someone who is healthy and has no symptoms and no conditions, then it may not need to be treated. However, if you find this in someone that has, in my opinion, any symptoms, then it may be a good idea to treat. And, again, this is because this pathogen in the gut may affect multiple things. And to give a little more context, actually, this patient their thyroid improve. They also saw chronic hives improve and edema or swelling improved.

All these things really illustrate the far-reaching impact that the gut can have on the rest of the body. So if you have an autoimmune condition, it’s a very good idea to go through a good gut screening or a really robust gut health kind of restorations plan.

Testing can be very helpful in this regard to see if there are any unwanted organisms to try to help with your autoimmune condition. Or if you have any other kind of condition that you’re trying to get to the underlying root cause of, addressing health of your gut can be a great strategy in improving how you’re feeling.

So this is Dr. Ruscio. And I hope this helps you get healthy about your life, thanks

If you need help with your thyroid or gut health, click here

What do you think? I would like to hear your thoughts or experience with this.

Discussion

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2 thoughts on “Gut Infection Linked to Hypothyroid

  1. This is most interesting to me because I have been working to treat leaky gut for a year and a half with healthy whole food diet free from gluten and dairy, and very low in sugar. H, pylori test is negative and stool testing is negative yet persistent T3 conversion is occurring. I’m reluctant to try antibiotic but very interested if major colonic detoxification program (like Ty Bollingers approach from the Truth About Cancer series), would take care of this? Any less involved detox programs that you are confident in?

  2. This is most interesting to me because I have been working to treat leaky gut for a year and a half with healthy whole food diet free from gluten and dairy, and very low in sugar. H, pylori test is negative and stool testing is negative yet persistent T3 conversion is occurring. I’m reluctant to try antibiotic but very interested if major colonic detoxification program (like Ty Bollingers approach from the Truth About Cancer series), would take care of this? Any less involved detox programs that you are confident in?

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