Practitioner Question of the Month – September 2018

Dr. Michael Ruscio’s Monthly – Future of Functional Medicine Review Clinical Newsletter Practical Solutions for Practitioners In This

Dr. Michael Ruscio’s Monthly – Future of Functional Medicine Review Clinical Newsletter

Practical Solutions for Practitioners

In This Month’s Issue

Practitioner Question of the Month

Practice Tip

Practitioner Question of the Month

Can probiotics cause SIBO

Sunja asks,

I recently virtually attended a SIBO conference and the consensus was not to use probiotics in those with SIBO.  This seems to run counter to what I have heard you recommended. What is your stance on probiotics in SIBO?

This is a contentious issue.  However, I feel the statement ‘one should not use probiotics in SIBO’ is untenable.  I recently answered this question in our weekly video. Essentially, you can only come to this conclusion if you cherry-pick the data.  It’s not to say probiotics will be well-tolerated by all, but clearly, they are a top consideration. Detailed here.

Practice Tip

Is your practice legally defensible?  

My office recently went through an audit to ensure we are not violating any regulations.  The main area where this is open to interpretation is telehealth. Here are a few key points to investigate if you have not already:

  • You are only performing visits through a HIPAA compliant platform for telehealth visits, we currently use Zoom
  • You are using the appropriate disclaimers and informed consents for telehealth patients/clients
  • You are not billing insurance for out of state telehealth patients unless the patient has been seen once per year in person
  • You have an extra set of disclaimers in your paperwork and in your recommendations for any out of state patients not being seen in person, once per year
  • You make sure to distinguish that you are not practicing conventional medicine, unless you are also offering/practicing this, to patients when they seek you out for functional medicine

Some of the informed consents and disclaimers feel to be a bit of an overkill, but in today’s litigious society, it is better to be safe than sorry.

If you have found this information helpful please share with a friend using this link: https://drruscio.com/review/

I’d like to hear your thoughts or questions regarding any of the above information. Please leave comments or questions below – it might become our next practitioner question of the month.

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Discussion

I care about answering your questions and sharing my knowledge with you. Leave a comment or connect with me on social media asking any health question you may have and I just might incorporate it into our next listener questions podcast episode just for you!

4 thoughts on “Practitioner Question of the Month – September 2018

  1. Hello ,
    I have treated many people using Hydrotherapy which in the 1800’s used to be a very avant guard science with many solutions for the illness present in the day in counterpoint to the dangerous concoctions offered by physicians of the day. Hydrotherapy is an old term for the more modern Thermal Medicine treatments involving sets and combinations of hot packs and application of short cold to elicit vasomotor, visceromotor reflex effects which can profoundly alter the way tissues and organ metabolism works. There is an increase in research in this area lately and I feel that Functional Medicine could easily adopt some of the treatments that can be conducted at home or others in spas with great potential to influence the course of most disease processes. I submitted an oral presentation for the meeting in FL this year but never received a reply from it. I would like to know if you have advise for me on how to expose the Population of Functional Medicine Professionals to this great treatments, rationale and application to many if not most diseases,

    Thank you

    WiL Remigio, MS, MPT, DSc
    Misericordia University
    Clinical and applied Pathophysiology

    1. Great question. Could you share your 5 most compelling references here? Keep applying and trying to get your message out, sometimes it take a while until you find your right niche/audience.

  2. Hello ,
    I have treated many people using Hydrotherapy which in the 1800’s used to be a very avant guard science with many solutions for the illness present in the day in counterpoint to the dangerous concoctions offered by physicians of the day. Hydrotherapy is an old term for the more modern Thermal Medicine treatments involving sets and combinations of hot packs and application of short cold to elicit vasomotor, visceromotor reflex effects which can profoundly alter the way tissues and organ metabolism works. There is an increase in research in this area lately and I feel that Functional Medicine could easily adopt some of the treatments that can be conducted at home or others in spas with great potential to influence the course of most disease processes. I submitted an oral presentation for the meeting in FL this year but never received a reply from it. I would like to know if you have advise for me on how to expose the Population of Functional Medicine Professionals to this great treatments, rationale and application to many if not most diseases,

    Thank you

    WiL Remigio, MS, MPT, DSc
    Misericordia University
    Clinical and applied Pathophysiology

    1. Great question. Could you share your 5 most compelling references here? Keep applying and trying to get your message out, sometimes it take a while until you find your right niche/audience.

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