Research Briefs for Practitioners – September 2022 - Dr. Michael Ruscio, DNM, DC
Future of Functional Medicine Review Clinical Newsletter

Research Briefs for Practitioners – September 2022

by Dr. Ruscio, DNM, DC, Gavin Guard, PA-C, MPAS, CISSN, Pn1, and the Ruscio Institute for Functional Medicine Clinical Team

Medically reviewed & fact checked by a
board-certified doctor
Medically reviewed & fact checked by a
board-certified doctor
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Episode 65

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Podcast Summary

Coming soon…


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Featured Studies

  • Effects of a low FODMAP diet on the colonic microbiome in irritable bowel syndrome: a systematic review with meta-analysis
    • 9 RCTs, 403 patients with IBS, randomized to:
      • Control diets
      • Low FODMAP diet (LFD)
    • Stool analysis was performed on all patients
    • Compared to control diets, the LFD led to: 
      • NO difference in overall microbiome diversity
      • NO difference in short chain fatty acid production
      • Lower abundance of bifidobacteria
    • Commentary: Despite a reduction in fermentable fiber, a LFD did NOT lead to lower SCFA or microbiome diversity. This puts a hole in the argument that a low FODMAP diet is not optimal because of lower SCFA production.

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Gastrointestinal Studies

  • Efficacy and Safety of High-dose Cholecalciferol in Patients With Inflammatory Bowel Disease Receiving Infliximab
    • 43 patients with IBD and vitamin D deficiency, treated with either: 
      • Low dose vitamin D (50,000 IU every 4-5 weeks)
        • =1,600 IU/d
      • High dose vitamin D (100,000 IU every 6-8 weeks)
        • = 2,000 IU/d
    • In both groups, vitamin D treatment led to:
      • Only 37% of patients achieving vitamin D sufficiency (≥ 30 ng/mL) 
      • NO difference in IBD symptoms 
    • Commentary: Patients with IBD likely require a higher dose of vitamin D, which may be because inflammatory conditions “utilize” more vitamin D.

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Thyroid & Hormones Study

  • The effect of oral vitamin E and omega-3 alone and in combination on menopausal hot flushes: A systematic review and meta-analysis
    • 9 studies, 1100 menopausal participants with hot flashes, randomized to:
      • Placebo
      • Vitamin E alone
      • Omega 3 alone
      • Vitamin E + Omega 3 
    • Compared to placebo: 
      • Combined vitamin E + omega 3 led to a reduction in hot flash intensity (small effect size) 
      • Vitamin E or omega 3 alone did NOT improve hot flashes 
    • Commentary: Vitamin E + omega 3 may slightly improve hot flashes in menopausal women. Consider adding in these nutrients in addition to basic lifestyle support and female hormone adaptogens for improving hot flashes.

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Diet & Lifestyle Studies


Discussion

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