Dr. Ruscio’s Wrap Up #149

Dr. Ruscio’s Wrap Up #149

Dr. Ruscio’s Wrap Up #149

In Case You Missed It

On Monday, we discussed a quality study that found that dieting can lead to eating disorders in children.

On Wednesday’s podcast release, we answered some listener questions on: arthritis, trustworthy supplement brands, HCl causing SIBO, thyroid antibodies, adrenal fatigue, and phage therapy.


Latest Research

Long term dietary intake of gluten was not associated with risk of coronary heart disease. However, the avoidance of gluten may result in reduced consumption of beneficial whole grains, which may affect cardiovascular risk. The promotion of gluten-free diets among people without celiac disease should not be encouraged.

Current evidence supports adjunctive use of S-adenosylmethionine (SAMe), methylfolate, omega-3, and vitamin D with antidepressants to reduce depressive symptoms.

Variations in thyroid function within the laboratory reference range have clinically relevant correlations with resting energy expenditure, BMI, and body composition in L-T4 treated subjects.

Bacterial richness and diversity were higher in non-Celiac Disease controls than in untreated Celiac Disease (CD) patients, but the differences were not statistically significant. This pyrosequencing analysis reveals a global picture of the duodenal microbiota that could be useful in future trials investigating the role of the microbiota in CD

Among patients with functional dyspepsia (FD), gluten-rich food may lead to symptom onset, specifically early satiety. Intestinal epithelial barrier dysfunction characterized by decreased claudin-1 expression and mucosal immune activation demonstrated by intraepithelial lymphocyte infiltration may contribute to the pathogenesis of FD.


Laugh a Little!

Dr. Ruscio’s Wrap Up #149


Healthy Foodie

Joyful Healthy Eats: Sour Cream & Chive Mashed Potatoes
PaleoLeap: Keto Broccoli Salad
PaleOMG: Honey Sriracha Shrimp Rice Bowls
Our Paleo Life: Chocolate Nut Butter Cups


Happiness Homework 

Think of 50 questions and so some research.


Dr. Ruscio’s Quotable

“Nature always wears the colors of the spirit.”
— Ralph Waldo Emerson

What do you think? I would like to hear your thoughts on the research, recipes and other info above.

I care about answering your questions and sharing my knowledge with you. Comment below with any health question you may have and I will incorporate it into our new monthly podcast just for you!

Dr. Ruscio is your leading functional and integrative doctor specializing in gut related disorders such as SIBO, leaky gut, Celiac, IBS and in thyroid disorders such as hypothyroid and hyperthyroid. For more information on how to become a patient, please contact our office. Serving the San Francisco bay area and distance patients via phone and Skype.

Discussion

I care about answering your questions and sharing my knowledge with you. Leave a comment or connect with me on social media asking any health question you may have and I just might incorporate it into our next listener questions podcast episode just for you!

10 thoughts on “Dr. Ruscio’s Wrap Up #149

  1. I have to say I disagree with this statement from the research: “The promotion of gluten-free diets among people without celiac disease should not be encouraged.” It absolutely should be encouraged for non-celiac patients with any autoimmune condition(s) – and I might suggest anyone with a family history of them. Why must we wait until our health is in decline? Some of my Hashimoto’s suffering would have been shortened by decades I believe, if this had been suggested to me (assuming I would have listened, lol.) My .02. Happy weekend!

  2. Dr Ruscio. how do you address SIBO when its caused by Lyme and co infections like mycoplasma? many of the treatments (herbal and medical) can damage the gut biome diversity which is really needed in the first place to keep these organisms in check. its very challenging to treat sibo and risk causing more damage. thanks

    1. Hi Kelly,
      I think your drawing some erroneous conclusions about treating SIBO damaging the gut. Most lyme experts I know recommend starting with gut treatments, including herbal antimicrobials, before Lyme treatment. So, in short, start with the gut, then move to co-infections, then to Lyme. This seems to be a reasonable sequence. But, check this with your doctor.

  3. Dr Ruscio. how do you address SIBO when its caused by Lyme and co infections like mycoplasma? many of the treatments (herbal and medical) can damage the gut biome diversity which is really needed in the first place to keep these organisms in check. its very challenging to treat sibo and risk causing more damage. thanks

    1. Hi Kelly,
      I think your drawing some erroneous conclusions about treating SIBO damaging the gut. Most lyme experts I know recommend starting with gut treatments, including herbal antimicrobials, before Lyme treatment. So, in short, start with the gut, then move to co-infections, then to Lyme. This seems to be a reasonable sequence. But, check this with your doctor.

  4. I have to say I disagree with this statement from the research: “The promotion of gluten-free diets among people without celiac disease should not be encouraged.” It absolutely should be encouraged for non-celiac patients with any autoimmune condition(s) – and I might suggest anyone with a family history of them. Why must we wait until our health is in decline? Some of my Hashimoto’s suffering would have been shortened by decades I believe, if this had been suggested to me (assuming I would have listened, lol.) My .02. Happy weekend!

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