Dr. Ruscio’s Weekly Wrap Up – #26

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In case you missed it

On Monday, we took a look at the evidence for SIBO. We weighed the evidence to gain an understanding of this confounding condition

On Wednesday’s podcast release, we took on gut infections and intracellular infections. Spurred on by a listener question, we laid out when these types of infections should be explored.


Latest Research

There was no statistically significant difference Trusted SourcePubMedGo to source in clinical and endoscopic remission between patients with UC who received fecal transplants from healthy donors and those who received their own fecal microbiota, which may be due to limited numbers.”

Rate of infections Trusted SourcePubMedGo to source tend to peak around the time of rheumatoid arthritis diagnosis according to a recent observational study.

Epstein Barr virus Trusted SourcePubMedGo to source shown to have no association with rheumatoid arthritis according to meta-analysis.  May still be linked to MS and SLE.

Shift work Trusted SourcePubMedGo to source can lead to obesity and diabetes.

You have a 7.5% chance Trusted SourcePubMedGo to source of having celiac disease if a 1st degree relative has it, according to a recent systemic review with meta-analysis.

Vitamin C supplementation Trusted SourcePubMedGo to source reduces anxiety.

C-section birth Trusted SourcePubMedGo to source associated with immune dysfunction by an impressively large observational study

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Laugh a Little!

Dr. Ruscio’s Weekly Wrap Up – #26 - funnymedicalschoolgraduationpartyinvitations r40de19622ccc4e2fb0dbe170853504a0zk9li512


Healthy Foodie

PaleOMG: Cauliflower Soup with Bacon and Brown Butter

Autoimmune Paleo: Ginger Spiced Cookies and Coconut Milk

Paleo Hacks: Paleo Pumpkin Ravioli

Clean Eating with a Dirty Mind: Brown Butter Snickerdoodles


Happiness Homework 

Dance: Turn on the radio, or your iPod, and dance away to your favorite songs.


Ruscio’s Quotable

Worrying does not empty tomorrow of it’s troubles. It empties today of its strength.

– Joy Each Day

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What do you think? I would like to hear your thoughts on the research, recipes and other info above.

Discussion

I care about answering your questions and sharing my knowledge with you. Leave a comment or connect with me on social media asking any health question you may have and I just might incorporate it into our next listener questions podcast episode just for you!

4 thoughts on “Dr. Ruscio’s Weekly Wrap Up – #26

  1. Hi Dr. Ruscio –

    In a podcast not long ago you implied urine testing for iodine
    sufficiency/deficiency is not accurate – you did not name names
    but I wondered if you were referring to Dr. Flechas and his FFP
    lab? You also did not agree with the assertion that iodine deficiency
    is widespread in the USA.

    I appreciated your explanation of why high dose iodine could be
    detrimental and should be used selectively.

    Do you have any references supporting what you insinuate (ie: that
    urine iodine testing is not accurate, that iodine deficiency is not
    widespread in the USA)?

    Are there methods to determine iodine status (replete/deficient)
    which are accurate?

    I am not a “slappy” for Dr. Flechas – I do want to know the truth!

    Thank you so much!

    Anne Schnedl, CNM, MSN/MPH
    Amor Vincit Omnia

    1. Hi Anne,
      I think you are referring to the iodine skin patch test. A 24 urine test is very accurate for iodine. Correct, iodine deficiency is not widespread as any search in a government database will reveal. We discussed methods of testing and treatment in the 3 part podcast series on iodine, try searching iodine in the search box – there are several references on these transcript pages. I will also be putting out more info on iodine after my book releases. Hope this helps!

  2. Hi Dr. Ruscio –

    In a podcast not long ago you implied urine testing for iodine
    sufficiency/deficiency is not accurate – you did not name names
    but I wondered if you were referring to Dr. Flechas and his FFP
    lab? You also did not agree with the assertion that iodine deficiency
    is widespread in the USA.

    I appreciated your explanation of why high dose iodine could be
    detrimental and should be used selectively.

    Do you have any references supporting what you insinuate (ie: that
    urine iodine testing is not accurate, that iodine deficiency is not
    widespread in the USA)?

    Are there methods to determine iodine status (replete/deficient)
    which are accurate?

    I am not a “slappy” for Dr. Flechas – I do want to know the truth!

    Thank you so much!

    Anne Schnedl, CNM, MSN/MPH
    Amor Vincit Omnia

    1. Hi Anne,
      I think you are referring to the iodine skin patch test. A 24 urine test is very accurate for iodine. Correct, iodine deficiency is not widespread as any search in a government database will reveal. We discussed methods of testing and treatment in the 3 part podcast series on iodine, try searching iodine in the search box – there are several references on these transcript pages. I will also be putting out more info on iodine after my book releases. Hope this helps!

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