Dr. Ruscio’s Wrap Up #213

In Case You Missed It

On Monday, we discussed a new IBS and SIBO treatment for tough cases.

On Wednesday, we spoke with Nalini Chilkov and discussed cancer-fighting foods, supplements, and lifestyle.

Latest Research

This review brings to light the issue of histamine intolerance dietary management. There has not been a proper consensus on histamine and other amines content in foods which makes it very difficult for patients to follow a true dietary protocol.


Lactose intolerance significantly increases the need for oral T4 in hypothyroid patients.


Gut microbiota influences our health by providing bile acid biotransformation. The data from this study provides clear evidence that:

“VSL#3 probiotic administration enhances fecal bile acid (BA) excretion and hepatic BA synthesis and requires a functional FXR/Fgf15 enterohepatic axis.”

Laugh a Little!

Healthy Foodie

Sébastien Noël: Dried Fruit Bars
Jason Glaspey, Founder: Chunky Turkey Chili
Mike: Paleo Moussaka
Elana Amsterdam: Turmeric Root Milk

Happiness Homework 

Go to your favorite workout class.

Dr. Ruscio’s Quotable

“When you say yes to others, make sure you are not saying no to yourself.”
— Paulo Coelho

What do you think? I would like to hear your thoughts or experience with this.

Dr. Ruscio is your leading functional and integrative doctor specializing in gut related disorders such as SIBO, leaky gut, Celiac, IBS and in thyroid disorders such as hypothyroid and hyperthyroid. For more information on how to become a patient, please contact our office. Serving the San Francisco bay area and distance patients via phone and Skype.

Discussion

I care about answering your questions and sharing my knowledge with you. Leave a comment or connect with me on social media asking any health question you may have and I just might incorporate it into our next listener questions podcast episode just for you!

12 thoughts on “Dr. Ruscio’s Wrap Up #213

  1. I have a history of diverticulosis and hypothyroidism. This past week, I’ve had a flare-up of digestive issues – not quite what I felt with diverticulitis, but not very comforting. I saw your book and see that everything symptom you listed is part of my reality so I bought your book. I’m wondering if you can recommend a functional medical provider in the Phoenix, Arizona area that understands your ideas (which I think are logical and correct).

    1. Hi Valerie,

      We don’t have a specific recommendation, but you may want to try the Institute of Functional Medicine’s directory. Also, Dr. Ruscio takes virtual patients if you’re interested in working with him. You can find out more info and apply here: https://www.drruscio.com/gethelp

  2. I am curious if you have covered the connection of hormones with the gut in your book on Health Gut Healthy. It was an interesting addition to the recent Digestion SOS summit.

  3. I have a history of diverticulosis and hypothyroidism. This past week, I’ve had a flare-up of digestive issues – not quite what I felt with diverticulitis, but not very comforting. I saw your book and see that everything symptom you listed is part of my reality so I bought your book. I’m wondering if you can recommend a functional medical provider in the Phoenix, Arizona area that understands your ideas (which I think are logical and correct).

    1. Hi Valerie,

      We don’t have a specific recommendation, but you may want to try the Institute of Functional Medicine’s directory. Also, Dr. Ruscio takes virtual patients if you’re interested in working with him. You can find out more info and apply here: https://www.drruscio.com/gethelp

  4. Dr Ruscio may have already covered this, but given that those born via cesarean section have a larger potential for a disordered GI microbiome how might the protocols in the book or elsewhere here on this site help them? Are there any additional things that they should consider for their GI health?

    I ask as my daughter was born cesarean and seems a bit more prone to GI issues than others but I also ask in that I can guess that he has some ideas about this and may have already talked about this but I missed it.

    Also somewhat related, in that my daughter has this and it’s related to GI issues, how might endometriosis play a role here in GI issues? Thus far it seems that it can play a role due to adhesions and/or inflammation in the gut but I’m not sure what else beyond that. And if this has been talked about already I’d like to learn more about it from Dr Ruscio as he seems to be a less prone to some of the more obscure treatments and uses clinical and other studies to determine how to handle such cases. Most of the things I’ve found thus far seem to be either surgery or doses of low level estrogen hormones.

  5. Dr Ruscio may have already covered this, but given that those born via cesarean section have a larger potential for a disordered GI microbiome how might the protocols in the book or elsewhere here on this site help them? Are there any additional things that they should consider for their GI health?

    I ask as my daughter was born cesarean and seems a bit more prone to GI issues than others but I also ask in that I can guess that he has some ideas about this and may have already talked about this but I missed it.

    Also somewhat related, in that my daughter has this and it’s related to GI issues, how might endometriosis play a role here in GI issues? Thus far it seems that it can play a role due to adhesions and/or inflammation in the gut but I’m not sure what else beyond that. And if this has been talked about already I’d like to learn more about it from Dr Ruscio as he seems to be a less prone to some of the more obscure treatments and uses clinical and other studies to determine how to handle such cases. Most of the things I’ve found thus far seem to be either surgery or doses of low level estrogen hormones.

  6. If we assume that one of the triggers of IBS is food poisoning, as per the recent findings for testing of anti-cdtb and anti-vinculin antibodies, what are some tips for avoiding food poisoning without going overboard? Asking as apparently once you start producing the antibodies you are more prone to get worse with future food poisoning at least per the studies and Dr Pimentel.

    Some of the things I’ve been paying a bit more attention to are to pay more attention to cooking raw meats sooner and not keeping leftovers for too long, making sure to weekly clean sink/cutting board/counters/etc, avoiding more “sketchy” food trucks, taking care to drink clean water sources. Any other thoughts here?

    Sorry for all the questions, but I love learning more and unfortunately the more I learn the more questions I have. LOL My searches here on the site brought up lots of talks but none seemed to be specific to this topic and were more just mentions of this potential cause.

  7. I am curious if you have covered the connection of hormones with the gut in your book on Health Gut Healthy. It was an interesting addition to the recent Digestion SOS summit.

  8. If we assume that one of the triggers of IBS is food poisoning, as per the recent findings for testing of anti-cdtb and anti-vinculin antibodies, what are some tips for avoiding food poisoning without going overboard? Asking as apparently once you start producing the antibodies you are more prone to get worse with future food poisoning at least per the studies and Dr Pimentel.

    Some of the things I’ve been paying a bit more attention to are to pay more attention to cooking raw meats sooner and not keeping leftovers for too long, making sure to weekly clean sink/cutting board/counters/etc, avoiding more “sketchy” food trucks, taking care to drink clean water sources. Any other thoughts here?

    Sorry for all the questions, but I love learning more and unfortunately the more I learn the more questions I have. LOL My searches here on the site brought up lots of talks but none seemed to be specific to this topic and were more just mentions of this potential cause.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *