Dr. Ruscio’s Wrap Up #207

Dr. Ruscio’s Wrap Up #207 - DrR Feature Images 207

In Case You Missed It

On Monday, we discussed if low carb or ketogenic diets are bad for your gut health.

On Wednesday’s podcast release, we spoke with Dr. Robert Abbott and discussed The Autoimmune Paleo Diet for Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis.

Latest Research

This study suggests that in genetically susceptible individuals …

“H. pylori infection can activate cross-reactive gastric T cells leading to gastric autoimmunity via molecular mimicry.”.


Though more human studies are needed, this study suggests that Mast Cells do play a role in various aspects of GI physiology and pathophysiology.

“Particularly in intestinal sensation, motility, secretion, permeability, and inflammation.”.


The findings in this study suggest that H. pylori Trusted SourcePubMedGo to source components, urease in particular, may be among the environmental triggers that initiate various autoimmune diseases.

Laugh a Little!

Dr. Ruscio’s Wrap Up #207 - CBUAhOnVEAEarkv

Healthy Foodie

Jason Glaspey, Founder: Mediterranean Vegetable Cakes
Sébastien Noël: Italian Chopped Salad
Emma Swanston: Sesame Crusted, Smoky Sweet Potato Burgers
Joel Runyon: Homemade Grapefruit Soda

Happiness Homework 

Read a new book or magazine.

Dr. Ruscio’s Quotable

“There are two ways to live: as if nothing is a miracle, or as if everything is a miracle.”
—Albert Einstein

What do you think? I would like to hear your thoughts or experience with this.

Dr. Ruscio is your leading functional and integrative doctor specializing in gut related disorders such as SIBO, leaky gut, Celiac, IBS and in thyroid disorders such as hypothyroid and hyperthyroid. For more information on how to become a patient, please contact our office. Serving the San Francisco bay area and distance patients via phone and Skype.

Discussion

I care about answering your questions and sharing my knowledge with you. Leave a comment or connect with me on social media asking any health question you may have and I just might incorporate it into our next listener questions podcast episode just for you!

12 thoughts on “Dr. Ruscio’s Wrap Up #207

  1. Speaking of intestinal sensation, have you done an episode or article about visceral hypersensitivity or similar? You’ve mentioned bits of it here and there but this topic I find interesting.

    While I know that there is a reason for the IBS that I have, tested positive for elevated anti-vinculin and once had lymphocytic colitis, I have wondered how much of the root cause of my own issue is just being too sensitive to the sensations that go on in my body. You’ve talked about listening to your body when trying to figure out IBS or gut issues but it sure seems to me that I’m hypersensitive to things which usually ends up in a vicious cycle of pain or sensations that cause me to get anxious or stressed which then exacerbate the symptoms. I’ve had times, including now, that it seems like I’m out of that cycle, but it seems to not take too much to get me back into it unfortunately.

    1. Meant to be a bit more specific on the topic of visceral hypersensitivity, as in what causes it or maintains it, and how might it be treated? Any studies of interest in this area? I imagine that various methods of mindfulness/relaxation and other similar psychological techniques can help, I seem to recall that oxytocin might help here, also guessing that endorphins might play a role.

        1. Thank you Drew, I’ll have to listen to that one again.

          I did find this study which was very helpful in listing several things.
          https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5056566/

          Also, as part of this discussion, if he does do it, I’m wondering if there is a difference between Visceral Hypersensitivity and Hypervigilance. They seem somewhat related, though I can see the former could include the mental aspects as well as physical whereas the latter seems more mind based I suppose.

  2. Speaking of intestinal sensation, have you done an episode or article about visceral hypersensitivity or similar? You’ve mentioned bits of it here and there but this topic I find interesting.

    While I know that there is a reason for the IBS that I have, tested positive for elevated anti-vinculin and once had lymphocytic colitis, I have wondered how much of the root cause of my own issue is just being too sensitive to the sensations that go on in my body. You’ve talked about listening to your body when trying to figure out IBS or gut issues but it sure seems to me that I’m hypersensitive to things which usually ends up in a vicious cycle of pain or sensations that cause me to get anxious or stressed which then exacerbate the symptoms. I’ve had times, including now, that it seems like I’m out of that cycle, but it seems to not take too much to get me back into it unfortunately.

    1. Meant to be a bit more specific on the topic of visceral hypersensitivity, as in what causes it or maintains it, and how might it be treated? Any studies of interest in this area? I imagine that various methods of mindfulness/relaxation and other similar psychological techniques can help, I seem to recall that oxytocin might help here, also guessing that endorphins might play a role.

        1. Thank you Drew, I’ll have to listen to that one again.

          I did find this study which was very helpful in listing several things.
          https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5056566/

          Also, as part of this discussion, if he does do it, I’m wondering if there is a difference between Visceral Hypersensitivity and Hypervigilance. They seem somewhat related, though I can see the former could include the mental aspects as well as physical whereas the latter seems more mind based I suppose.

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