Dr. Ruscio’s Wrap Up #127

In Case You Missed It

On Monday, we discussed how probiotics improve gas and constipation by decreasing bad bacteria in the gut.

On Wednesday’s podcast release, we discussed red meat & ill health, probiotics for weight loss, thyroid autoimmunity and quality of life, low carb and leaky gut, elimination diets and dysbiosis in autism, and more in another health news update.


Latest Research

This meta-analysis showed that serum vitamin D levels were lower in atopic dermatitis patients and vitamin D supplementation could be a new therapeutic option for atopic dermatitis.

The meta-analysis suggested that adding neither topical calcineurin inhibitors nor topical vitamin-D3 analogs on narrow band ultraviolet B can yield significantly superior outcomes than narrow band ultraviolet B monotherapy for treatment of vitiligo (a condition that causes the loss of skin color in blotches). However, the addition of topical calcineurin inhibitors to NB-UVB may increase treatment outcomes in vitiligo affecting the face and neck.

This review updates current evidence on the association between thyroid dysfunction and cardiovascular disease, as well as on screening and treatment of subclinical thyroid dysfunction. Recommendations on screening are discordant, but most guidelines advocate that thyroid function should be checked in those at risk for hypothyroidism, those over 60, and those with known coronary heart disease and heart failure.

Levothyroxine (LT4) supplementation showed beneficial effects in pregnancy outcomes among patients with thyroid dysfunction. Thus, LT4 should be recommended to improve clinical pregnancy outcomes in women with thyroid dysfunction.

This study found probiotics can improve glucose control and lipid metabolism in patients with type 2 diabetes.


Laugh a Little!


Healthy Foodie

Jason Glaspey, Founder: Pigs In a Blanket
Gina Homolka: Stuffed Pepper Soup
Sara Tane: Paleo Spaghetti Squash Shakshuka
Loren Cordain: Plantain Paleo Cakes w. Cacao Frosting


Happiness Homework 

Create a vision board and bring your next adventure to life.


Dr. Ruscio’s Quotable

“Nothing is impossible, the word itself says ‘I’m possible’!”
— Audrey Hepburn

 

What do you think? I would like to hear your thoughts on the research, recipes and other info above.

I care about answering your questions and sharing my knowledge with you. Comment below with any health question you may have and I will incorporate it into our new monthly podcast just for you!

Dr. Ruscio is your leading functional and integrative doctor specializing in gut related disorders such as SIBO, leaky gut, Celiac, IBS and in thyroid disorders such as hypothyroid and hyperthyroid. For more information on how to become a patient, please contact our office. Serving the San Francisco bay area and distance patients via phone and Skype.

Discussion

I care about answering your questions and sharing my knowledge with you. Leave a comment or connect with me on social media asking any health question you may have and I just might incorporate it into our next listener questions podcast episode just for you!

2 thoughts on “Dr. Ruscio’s Wrap Up #127

  1. Hi Ruscio: from my son Jordan

    My question is this: Where should I be looking to uncover my SIBO source/weakness and kick it to the curb when I don’t show any typical symptoms? If I don’t have gas/bloating/other stomach pain, do i really have to avoid foods that I otherwise eat and is easy college life food for me? I’m avoiding so many things i.e. steamed asparagus, broccoli, apples, baked beans, potatoes, sugars. . What problem is still active in my GI that it is not responding? And where could I get a SIBO specific professional consult online? I’m heading back to my Junior year of chemical engineering program and no time for doctors.

    I have following your podcast since being diagnosed with Hydrogen SIBO last spring by my new functional medicine doctor. I was disappointed 6 months later (after GI Microbex, probiotic, HCL tabs, digestive enzymes, l-glutamine and rarely eating wheat and dairy) to retest and find only ‘some’ improvement. From there my family went on a few week journey with me of eating low fodmap and gut healing bone broth. Its been 3 more months and I would like to retest and get on to other things they found but….

    I went to this dr because I’ve been congested nearly my whole life ( I am 20) and have low energy. After a big bunch of questions on everything including my eating and GI, they tested for SIBO because in high school I had months of stomach pain and gas. They found SIBO along with high estrogen, low testosterone (400) and high inflammation markers in my body so ‘leaky gut’.

    We paid $$$ for food sensitivity testing to find that I was reacting to the regular foods i eat. NOW I know that’s no surprise because of probable leaky gut. YOU are not big on unnecessary tests. MY DOCTOR is not a SIBO expert although I appreciate they found these things. I need to figure a plan out before all this snowballs and life gets even more hectic and I’m not around parents who can help with the grass fed beef and home grown garden and organic food stuff.

    I feel like I’m circling around this awareness but am not doing enough to fix it and its all interrelated: SIBO, estrogen dominance, leaky gut etc. That awareness has been elevated greatly due to your podcasts so I thought what the heck, maybe you do have time to point me in the right direction.

    Do other details tie into the SIBO?… 20 yr old white male, Pregnenolone <5, Estradiol 48; Testosterone 400; Free Testosterone 79; Bioavailable Testosterone 176.3; AIC 5.0; TSH 2.69; Free T3 3.20; Free T4 1.7; Cardio CRP down to .06 with supplements; Vitamin D was 40 but now 70 with supplement. Other testings shows Ok. Eat: smoothie for breakfast most days: Dr. Axe bone broth and Collegen powder with Kale, blueberries, coconut oil or MCT oil and warm green tea. Sometimes celery. used to be avocado but now see that is a fodmap food! OTHER FOODS: grass fed beef or our own chicken, salads with olive oil and balsamic vinegar, carrots, tomatoes, cucumber, sweet potatoes, some potatoes. No broccoli, brussel sprouts, cauliflower, asparagus veggies since we came across formap. Eating pork rind chips for crunch and now cassava chips but just found out those too are fodmap.

  2. Hi Ruscio: from my son Jordan

    My question is this: Where should I be looking to uncover my SIBO source/weakness and kick it to the curb when I don’t show any typical symptoms? If I don’t have gas/bloating/other stomach pain, do i really have to avoid foods that I otherwise eat and is easy college life food for me? I’m avoiding so many things i.e. steamed asparagus, broccoli, apples, baked beans, potatoes, sugars. . What problem is still active in my GI that it is not responding? And where could I get a SIBO specific professional consult online? I’m heading back to my Junior year of chemical engineering program and no time for doctors.

    I have following your podcast since being diagnosed with Hydrogen SIBO last spring by my new functional medicine doctor. I was disappointed 6 months later (after GI Microbex, probiotic, HCL tabs, digestive enzymes, l-glutamine and rarely eating wheat and dairy) to retest and find only ‘some’ improvement. From there my family went on a few week journey with me of eating low fodmap and gut healing bone broth. Its been 3 more months and I would like to retest and get on to other things they found but….

    I went to this dr because I’ve been congested nearly my whole life ( I am 20) and have low energy. After a big bunch of questions on everything including my eating and GI, they tested for SIBO because in high school I had months of stomach pain and gas. They found SIBO along with high estrogen, low testosterone (400) and high inflammation markers in my body so ‘leaky gut’.

    We paid $$$ for food sensitivity testing to find that I was reacting to the regular foods i eat. NOW I know that’s no surprise because of probable leaky gut. YOU are not big on unnecessary tests. MY DOCTOR is not a SIBO expert although I appreciate they found these things. I need to figure a plan out before all this snowballs and life gets even more hectic and I’m not around parents who can help with the grass fed beef and home grown garden and organic food stuff.

    I feel like I’m circling around this awareness but am not doing enough to fix it and its all interrelated: SIBO, estrogen dominance, leaky gut etc. That awareness has been elevated greatly due to your podcasts so I thought what the heck, maybe you do have time to point me in the right direction.

    Do other details tie into the SIBO?… 20 yr old white male, Pregnenolone <5, Estradiol 48; Testosterone 400; Free Testosterone 79; Bioavailable Testosterone 176.3; AIC 5.0; TSH 2.69; Free T3 3.20; Free T4 1.7; Cardio CRP down to .06 with supplements; Vitamin D was 40 but now 70 with supplement. Other testings shows Ok. Eat: smoothie for breakfast most days: Dr. Axe bone broth and Collegen powder with Kale, blueberries, coconut oil or MCT oil and warm green tea. Sometimes celery. used to be avocado but now see that is a fodmap food! OTHER FOODS: grass fed beef or our own chicken, salads with olive oil and balsamic vinegar, carrots, tomatoes, cucumber, sweet potatoes, some potatoes. No broccoli, brussel sprouts, cauliflower, asparagus veggies since we came across formap. Eating pork rind chips for crunch and now cassava chips but just found out those too are fodmap.

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